Featured Products
Our Colossal Security Pack
Our Colossal Security Pack
1 Super Survival Pack, 1 4 Grain Collection, 1 Heirloom Herb Collection
Our Three Sisters Collection Our Heirloom Herb Collection Flint Indian Corn
Flint Indian Corn
Late corn for grinding and making succotash
1/2 pint - Approx. 960 seeds

Articles

Imagine this scenario: You are planning for an emergency situation, so you purchased a collection of open-pollinated vegetable seeds. Saving seeds from year to year was your goal. You need to feed your family so this is serious stuff. You plant and care for your garden and have a good crop. Now it comes time for seed collection. You carefully harvest and fully dry seed for next year's garden....
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The corn that we sell at Seed for Security, was bred here on our farm years ago, before GMO seeds were available. Our farm is surrounded by tall mature hardwood forest land. Our corn germination rate is 95% this year. Every year I grow more corn to have a steady fresh supply of seed. According to Suzanne Ashworth, in her book Seed to Seed, Flint corn will retain a high germination rate for up...
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Native Americans all across the USA planted these three crops for a very good reason. By combining them in there diet they had a base of complete nutrition. It is not just any kind of beans. corn and squash. You need to grow mature dry beans, corn as a grain and winter keeping squash. String beans, sweet corn and summer squash will not do. Neither beans or corn develop protein until fully mature...
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Whether you are planting a garden this year or saving seeds for a future garden you need the freshest seed available. All seeds do have a shelf life and deteriorate over time. Start with recently harvested seed which is the freshest seed available. When saving seed for long term storage Buy fresh seed to start with. Store fully dry seeds in a cool, dry location. Freeze seeds for the longest...
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If you are saving seeds to plant in next years garden you do! For example - All squash varieties are outbreeding which means they are insect pollinated. Squashes are divided into 6 different species and different varieties within the same species will cross readily. Crossing however does not occur between the different species. So what in the world does that all mean? O.K. say you plant Buttercup...
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My customers keep asking me how many acres does our Super Survival Pack plant. Well, that depends on how closely you plant your seeds. I calculated plant spacing, following recommended measurements, and came up with a little over a 1/6 of an acre. There are 4 pounds of seeds in our Super Survival Pack. The Super Survival Pack will make an enormous garden. There will be food to eat fresh, can,...
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I like both pumpkins and squash as Winter vegetables because they keep without canning, drying or freezing. Only a cool dry room is needed to store them. Use our Small Sugar Pumpkins first, they keep past Christmas. Waltham Butternut Squash keeps here into the early Spring. Combined you have dark orange colored vegetables for six months of the year. Squash and Pumpkins are not hard to grow...
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Once you have your place to garden or homestead, there are a number of kinds of food you can harvest from beds or plantings which are relatively permanent. For example, I have been cutting asparagus shoots for weeks now, and the rhubarb is ready as well. Dandelions grow wild in our lawn and fields, but if they did not we could establish a small bed just for them. You could do the same for...
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Dry Beans are the best source of protein you can easily grow in your garden. In order to cook dry mature beans, they are normally soaked over night, and boiled until they are as soft as you want to serve them. This could be one or two hours, depending on what variety of bean you are cooking, and how soft you like them. Seasoning with salt, sugar or anything which contains some acid, such as tomato...
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Be sure to stop by our "Videos" and watch "Harvesting Flint Indian Corn at Seed for Security". From the home page just click on the word 'Videos' in green lettering to see a list of all of them. Our corn is ripe for the harvest. I began collecting dry ears three days ago. Around October 7th is my usual harvest date but this year the crops are about one and a half weeks early. How do you...
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Sometimes called the Cole crops, this family of cold hardy vegetables also includes Kale. They readily cross pollinate, so if you want to save seeds, you MUST choose only ONE variety of ONE of these crops in the entire family. The flowers do not form to pollinate until the second year of growth. You must Winter over at least a half dozen plants from the previous year. The second year is when you have...
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I did not even sell tomato seeds at first. It is not that I don't grow and really love to eat them. Tomatoes do require starting indoors here in the North. That is not usually a project for beginning gardeners. They are very tricky because they are vulnerable to plant diseases, and need to have just the right amount of heat and water. Artificial light or a well heated greenhouse are needed too. When...
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We live in a time of plenty. Foods are brought to our local stores from far and wide. When times get tough, what foods will we NEED to eat? Now we often look to our garden or a produce department to provide vitamin rich fresh foods. Colorful salads look great, but we need foods which provide the energy to keep us going. Our bodies need protein to maintain them. Vitamin and mineral deficiencies won't...
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When I was a young girl, Spring was ushered in with freshly caught rainbow trout and dandelion salad. My dad and I got up early on the first day of fishing season and caught our limit. Mom would have some tender young dandelions already picked over so she could put them together in a salad. Oh what a wonderful lunch that was! I still love the taste of fresh young dandelions. Picked early in the season,...
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Carrots and parsnips are both excellent served as boiled vegetables and cooked in soups and stews. They are hearty sources of carbohydrates as well as vitamins and minerals. This is very important to anyone who is actually hungry. We live in a time when diet foods are constantly promoted for having few calories. That is good for couch potato TV watchers, and those whose life's 'work' is behind a...
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I love all the members of the onion family, and the tastes they bring to our table. Claims are made they improve our health, and help our bodies fight disease. So why aren't I selling them, you ask? Onion seed has one of the shortest lifespans of any garden seed. Germination rates fall by the second year, so it cannot be kept for long term storage, no matter what you do to preserve it. Bulbs or...
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I have a number of recipes and links about making kraut in the Simple Recipe Article. This Article is about canning the kraut for long term storage. Because of the high acid content, a pressure canner is not needed. Water bath canners are safe to use. Get your basic water bath canning methods and processing times from a source you trust, such as the USDA recommendations found in modern books. I like...
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Be sure to stop by our 'Videos' in green lettering on the homepage to find "Harvesting Flint Indian Corn at Seed for Security" Flint and Dent corn are truly the King of American grains. Where ever Corn can be grown, it yields more grain from less seed. It needs fertile soil, and a good amount of water throughout the growing season. It likes at least two months of hot weather. You may have...
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Beans are the most important single garden crop. Once fully mature, they provide protein. Peas and lentils are part of the same family too. I like both of those, but I'd much rather choose from the milder beans to eat every day. They are all Legumes, which means they can use Nitrogen from the air to make protein. Other vegetables or grains can't do that. Peanuts, clover and alfalfa are in the Legume...
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These are ideal crops to grow because they are so easy to keep in a cool dry place. For back room storage, select sound fruit, free of surface damage. Let it cure in a sunny but dry place, such as a porch or car port. Later, If your house is still too warm, a dry barn or shed is fine until colder weather. Then you can safely bring them inside. During this whole process, protect them from freezing....
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The easiest to grow, starchy vegetable is the Jerusalem Artichoke. This vigorous relative of sunflower, tobacco, tomato, and potato is a member of the Nightshade family. It is raised to produce eatable roots. It is started from root cuttings, like potatoes, and forms tubers in the fall. Your first harvest can begin after the tops die back for winter. Dig in spots scattered throughout the bed....
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Even with only a relatively small area to work with, much of our food can be grown at home. This is how to start. You should have a very short list of foods you absolutely will not eat, or are allergic to. Remember, freshly harvested foods all taste much better than anything you can buy. Your goal is to be harvesting a reasonably balanced diet as many months out of the year as possible and to store...
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Most people eat far more starchy foods than meats or vegetables. Wheat, Rice, Corn, Potatoes and Beans have been the foundation of many cultures. These are field crops that don't require the attention of vegetables, but will need several times as much space to grow a year's supply. Your local climate will determine which ones you can grow. I'd try to find out what the native peoples and early settlers...
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Be sure to stop by our 'Videos' section by clicking on that word in green lettering on our homepage. There you can see 'Harvesting Flint Indian Corn at Seed for Security' and all the rest of our informative videos. Part 1 - Selecting the type to grow Anywhere field corn can be grown; it is usually the most important crop. Farmers love it for animal feed. Let's take a close look at home production...
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You can only learn what crops will do well in your own garden by experimenting. Try a small area of several varieties and pay close attention to how much work they are to take care of, how well they yield, and how well you like the taste of them. To me, the most important crop is dry baking beans, because they are high in protein. We let the string beans fully mature and dry, after several pickings,...
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Asparagus is an ideal crop to grow because it is harvested after the spinach I have Wintered over but before Spring sown spinach and lettuce are ready. Instead of eating stored vegetables during this time, you can be eating fresh. It is also grown in a permanent bed, and only needs attention at certain times of the year, so it is ideal to establish at a remote retreat. Starting asparagus from...
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